Friends of the Professional Car Society - Official Website of the Professional Car Society, Inc.Friends of the Professional Car Society - Official Website of the Professional Car Society, Inc.



Go Back   Friends of the Professional Car Society - Official Website of the Professional Car Society, Inc. > Professional Car Discussion > Technical Discussion Forum

Technical Discussion Forum For the discussion of technical questions about Professional Cars and their repair and maintenance. Posting in this forum is limited to PCS Members and / or Site Supporters. We encourage all website users to become members of the Professional Car Society and / or become Site Supporter.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-21-2018, 08:21 AM
Richard Vyse Richard Vyse is offline
Website Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New Smyrna Beach FL 32168
Posts: 5,206
Thanks: 6,217
Thanked 7,176 Times in 2,363 Posts
Groans: 2
Groaned at 13 Times in 5 Posts
Default Paul's message on tires

We've all heard it for years from Paul about tires. Just because they look good and have lots of thread on them does not mean they are safe. Terri and I took the motorhome to Alabama to enjoy my grandson's birthday. Headed out early Friday morning getting to Jacksonville and then "BOOM" inside right rear tire blows. Ok, happened to be a place nearby so had them put the spare on. What's the worse that can happen so headed out again. Got to Lake City about 100 miles later and, "BOOM" the spare blows out. Limped to next exit and there happens to be a tire place. This time we purchased two new tires for the front, moved one to the inside rear and used one for a spare. Everything is great enjoyed the weekend. Headed home Monday morning getting about 100 miles down the road and "BOOM" left inside rear blows. Lucky again there just happens to be a tire place at the next exit. This time four new tires. So we ended up replacing all 6 tires on the trip. "DAMN" The tires looked new but turns out they were 10 years old. RV tires need changing every 5-6 years regardless of how they look.
So heed Paul's advice and be wary of old tires that still look new.
Attached Images
   
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Richard Vyse For This Useful Post:
Mike McDonald (08-22-2018), Philip Scanio (08-21-2018)
  #2  
Old 08-21-2018, 09:08 AM
Richard Vyse Richard Vyse is offline
Website Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New Smyrna Beach FL 32168
Posts: 5,206
Thanks: 6,217
Thanked 7,176 Times in 2,363 Posts
Groans: 2
Groaned at 13 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Vyse View Post
thread.
Correction "TREAD". Too early I guess.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-21-2018, 10:33 AM
Blake Sherwin's Avatar
Blake Sherwin Blake Sherwin is offline
Website Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Owasso OK 74021
Posts: 415
Thanks: 26
Thanked 183 Times in 89 Posts
Groans: 0
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Yeah when I bought my 68, those tires were 13 years old. Changed those first thing. This reminds me I need to check my tire pressure again here soon
__________________
1968 Cadillac MM Combination
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-21-2018, 10:46 AM
John ED Renstrom's Avatar
John ED Renstrom John ED Renstrom is offline
PCS Member - Elected Director 2017-2020
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hot Springs SD 57747
Posts: 11,251
Thanks: 3,990
Thanked 14,517 Times in 6,152 Posts
Groans: 2
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Still confuses me that they make tires that are designed to self destruct with age.
__________________
drop in for coffee anytime
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-21-2018, 11:06 AM
Paul Steinberg Paul Steinberg is offline
PCS Past President / Senior Website Administrator
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Woodstock CT 06281
Posts: 6,330
Thanks: 6,732
Thanked 11,777 Times in 3,858 Posts
Groans: 0
Groaned at 9 Times in 9 Posts
Default

They aren't designed to self destruct, it has to do with the way that radial tires are designed. Radial tires flex in such a way that after they have aged, the rubber starts to separate from the carcass of the tire. This separation causes friction, which eventually leads to the tire blowing out. This doesn't happen with bias ply tires, and they seem to last forever. I remember driving my 1928 Buick with tires that the rubber was so hard, that if you locked the wheel up, it would have left a thick black rubber skid mark on the ground. I was never able to do that with that car, since it had mechanical brakes that relied on a cotton braking material that would clamp onto the brake drum. Terribly inefficient braking, and a panic stop at 25 MPH, was a terrifying experience.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-21-2018, 11:35 AM
Richard Vyse Richard Vyse is offline
Website Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New Smyrna Beach FL 32168
Posts: 5,206
Thanks: 6,217
Thanked 7,176 Times in 2,363 Posts
Groans: 2
Groaned at 13 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Steinberg View Post
They aren't designed to self destruct, it has to do with the way that radial tires are designed. Radial tires flex in such a way that after they have aged, the rubber starts to separate from the carcass of the tire. This separation causes friction, which eventually leads to the tire blowing out. This doesn't happen with bias ply tires, and they seem to last forever. I remember driving my 1928 Buick with tires that the rubber was so hard, that if you locked the wheel up, it would have left a thick black rubber skid mark on the ground. I was never able to do that with that car, since it had mechanical brakes that relied on a cotton braking material that would clamp onto the brake drum. Terribly inefficient braking, and a panic stop at 25 MPH, was a terrifying experience.
I'm was also informed that the amount of oil used to make tires has been reduced due to the higher cost of oil.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-21-2018, 01:00 PM
Terry Lange Terry Lange is offline
PCS Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Mesa AZ 85215
Posts: 348
Thanks: 2,068
Thanked 1,359 Times in 337 Posts
Groans: 1
Groaned at 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

7 years appears to be the recommended replacement schedule on RV tires, regardless of appearance, mileage and tread. They also have a speed rating. How fast do you drive that thing?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-21-2018, 01:14 PM
Adam Borkat Adam Borkat is offline
PCS Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Marietta GA
Posts: 1,023
Thanks: 2,506
Thanked 2,978 Times in 907 Posts
Groans: 0
Groaned at 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

I took delivery of a new toy last night, and at 8am this morning, I was up at the shop getting new tires for just this reason. They looked perfect, but the date code on them was from 2006.
__________________
God grant me the serenity
to mourn the cars I cannot save;
the money to save the cars I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.
Amen.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Adam Borkat For This Useful Post:
Richard Vyse (08-22-2018)
  #9  
Old 08-22-2018, 01:47 AM
John ED Renstrom's Avatar
John ED Renstrom John ED Renstrom is offline
PCS Member - Elected Director 2017-2020
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hot Springs SD 57747
Posts: 11,251
Thanks: 3,990
Thanked 14,517 Times in 6,152 Posts
Groans: 2
Groaned at 3 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Mine only get replaced with bias plys. My only question is if the know this is a problem and they continue to build tire that do this, just how much property damage or deaths have accrued due to there faulty products. Has any tire salesmanship told you that you can't run this tire more the 7 years from the date of manufacture?
__________________
drop in for coffee anytime
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to John ED Renstrom For This Useful Post:
Kurt Arends (08-22-2018)
  #10  
Old 08-22-2018, 08:35 AM
Richard Vyse Richard Vyse is offline
Website Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: New Smyrna Beach FL 32168
Posts: 5,206
Thanks: 6,217
Thanked 7,176 Times in 2,363 Posts
Groans: 2
Groaned at 13 Times in 5 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Lange View Post
7 years appears to be the recommended replacement schedule on RV tires, regardless of appearance, mileage and tread. They also have a speed rating. How fast do you drive that thing?
Just 65 mph
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
a message to my fellow Pro Car Friends Rick Franklin General Discussion Forum 9 05-26-2014 01:25 AM
Hankook Tires Liked by Cooper Tires Rep James Fischer Technical Discussion Forum 11 06-10-2012 02:01 PM
Carl Woerner Message LeeAnn Boston General Discussion Forum 1 07-18-2010 11:33 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2009 - 2018 Friends of the Professional Car Society