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Old 03-06-2015, 10:50 PM
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Nicholas Studer Nicholas Studer is offline
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Default Rhinecliff updates

Fun progress on the Rhinecliff FD Rescue Squad 1963 Pinner-Chrysler ambulance.

1. New carpet's in place. Some may know the carpet had gotten wet from a chronic water leak, and Paul had cut it up a bit in the process. Unfortunately, the RockAuto standard stuff wasn't a good fit. We wanted to save the original heel pad too - which required a trip to the upholestery shop - who hooked us up for the privilege of working on the Pinner family's craftsmanship. We're very happy - looks just as good - if not better than new.

2. Motrac is back! Research coupled with annoying trial and error underneath the dash determined where the mounting brackets had been for the speaker and control head. Cable for the antenna was still there - the holes for the Low-Band Motrac itself were still present. With enough deduction and some time on eBay - all the major components were found. More importantly - the local Motorola dealer (in business since the 1950s) had folks experience with the Motracs and thrilled to work on it. Believe it or not - our Motrac is in fully functional order right now. They were even able to salvage a damaged pre-1965 metal connector cable so we're not tarnishing the vehicle with an inaccurate newer plastic cable. We had them disconnect the main tube in it so it does not draw a massive current draw - no reason for that when all we really want is for the red light to glow if mic is depressed. Otherwise - same as when first in service - November 1963. Well, besides the newer mic that we will replace shortly. And yes, we'll be replacing the damaged/near-gone water-slide decals on the dash that show the radio call sign and station ID as soon as we find suitable near-exact replacements.

3. A dusty environment in the pseudo-desert (regardless of indoor storage) - requires a blanket. A T-10D parachute canopy works well and seems rather fitting.

Thanks and kudos again to Paul Steinberg for fixing all of the mechanical nightmares few others would've been able to tackle. I surely wouldn't be able to worry about these minor details on what is a solid car above all. Next stop - full stocking of the ambulance with equipment as described in recently discovered documents from when it was placed into service! Hopefully in time for the meet in June...
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Old 03-06-2015, 11:35 PM
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John ED Renstrom John ED Renstrom is offline
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looks right when you get it right. but man that camper port makes the rig look tiny
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Old 03-16-2015, 10:24 PM
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New license plate I lucked out and found for the front. Have it's antique tag on the back of course - thank goodness for a state that only requires a rear one. Now all I need to find is a bolt-on 63 number update cheap.
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Old 03-22-2015, 06:31 PM
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Besides siren angst described at http://www.professionalcarsociety.or...ad.php?t=17283 , the mystery of what the four holes on the passenger side shelf of the ambulance have been solved. This was asked about here: http://www.professionalcarsociety.or...13&postcount=5

They correspond to Big Beam Model 266 or 211 floodlights with mounting bracket... How I figured this out was from pure serendipity indeed. I knew from a previous news story that the ambulance carried two "hand lanterns." Someone I was talking to recently about the car mentioned off hand that when he ran a midwestern county ambulance service in the 1970s, hand lights and flares were normally kept up front in all their cars. At the same time as this conversation, an auction for a Big Beam with bracket came up on eBay for $15, and on a whim I bought it. Turns out to be the right thing after all. Now the problem is I need a second bracket at least and they're near-unobtainium and I lucked out big time finding just one. The company just discontinued making the lights, and says they haven't made brackets since the 1970s. Anyone got a lead?

I previously didn't notice this hole up front behind the bumper until spending quality time polishing... What did it correspond to? My contact at RCFD told me it corresponded to a yellow Dutchess County Ambulance Association sign on some kind of pedestal mount that he could only vaguely remember. That would make sense since the Association helped fund equipment for it when the ambulance was put in service. Searching that organization name turned up a patch that sold on eBay in the past - and I surely lucked out again. It's the same design. Now to just figure out what kind of mount it was and maybe a bit more on the sign to have it remade. I've frankly had little luck thus far.

Wish I could find another patch too - I ended up finding one of the later patches from the Ambulance Rescue Course (pictured as well)
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Old 05-10-2015, 01:46 AM
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Very unusual for 1963 - this ambulance was equipped with "stationary oxygen supplies." For its later life at least - it carried an E cylinder propped up on an assortment of cut 2x4" pieces. Obviously not what it had been designed for. I was unsure what was original - as the size is not the usual M cylinder many later ambulances carried up until today. A photo of the pre-Emergency! era LACoFD rescue squads held the answer - a Q cylinder! "Q's" are rather uncommon these days - but a welding supply store happened to have a nice steel one of 1983 vintage. Hopefully no one will hold the stamp in the side against me.

This is probably the most inconvenient oxygen cylinder I've ever changed. Steel's heavy as hell, and not easy angling it to get in the door, then into the cabinet. Tight fit indeed. One small wood block was different from the others, and was necessary to get proper height of the valve. Photo below of the cylinder in place and National Gas Company oxygen regulator (with humidifier!). Looks nice!

1" thick yellow foam was present in the back of the cabinet, and was too thick for the door to close with cylinder in place. It probably was installed by the Fire Department for the E cylinder - but maybe was original (sure hope not) - door refused to close no matter what I did. The "cut-out" in the door is for the buckle on the strap, but still no-go... Maybe that was one of the reasons they stopped using the Q cylinders and went to E's. The transport time was short there, however. I was able to remove it in one sheet, and will replace with 0.5" thick otherwise identical sheet this week. With foam in place - I hope that will move the tank and regulator forward so it's not so close to the cabinet.
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Old 05-10-2015, 07:22 AM
Wayne Krakowski Wayne Krakowski is offline
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For most old medics a ready supply of bandages was a must,changing one of the large oxygen cylinders usually resulted in many pinches, scrapes and knucklebusters,and was always done away from earshot of the public for the inevitable cussing that went with doing this task.
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Old 06-02-2015, 10:36 PM
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So that's what goes in there...

In all seriousness - tried a water can and no joy. Just WAY too tight a fit. Mid-size ANSUL dry chem cartridge extinguisher fits OK and is period correct. Will add bolt cutters, axe, pry bar, and cable cutters in there too after rotating ANSUL lengthwise. Worst case some of that will go under the bench with the Porto-Power Rescue Set, Robinson Orthopedic Stretcher, and one day the Reeves stretcher.

Really no good data on extinguishers carried outside of the fact it carried three per news article. Compartment on the passenger side obviously carried two more large extinguishers. Next burning question is hand-pump or soda-acid water extinguisher along with the CO2 that surely had to be there?
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Old 06-03-2015, 12:03 PM
Paul Steinberg Paul Steinberg is offline
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There is no way that they would carry a soda acid extinguisher in the vehicle. They were almost always used inside of buildings, where there was little to no chance of it freezing. Besides, it is much to bulky to be on an ambulance. I still believe that a lot of what was printed in the news article was more for "effect", than actual fact. It was an ambulance, not a fully equipped rescue truck, besides, they had an abundance of other trucks that could and would respond if necessary.
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Old 06-03-2015, 01:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Steinberg View Post
There is no way that they would carry a soda acid extinguisher in the vehicle. They were almost always used inside of buildings, where there was little to no chance of it freezing. Besides, it is much to bulky to be on an ambulance. I still believe that a lot of what was printed in the news article was more for "effect", than actual fact. It was an ambulance, not a fully equipped rescue truck, besides, they had an abundance of other trucks that could and would respond if necessary.
SAFD carried soda acid and folks here suggested that for water as hand-pump was the other common option in 1963. The usual pressurized water cans seen today were just coming available at that time. Howevever, obviously low risk of freezing down here...

Per Dr. Steve Levy, who worked on it from 1972-1976, the vehicle was still carrying most of the rescue stuff listed in the original news article. Possible exception of the water rescue gear by then. At the time the vehicle was first placed in service, the engine was the only other apparatus. Further, rather than being listed as an ambulance with Dutchess County radio system - it was listed as Rhinecliff Rescue 1. Lastly, design specs on the cabinetry were changed by the Ambulance Committee in order to accommodate more equipment stowage according to the meeting minutes of the department. The cabinetry appear very similar to what would later be billed as the "Rescue Cabinet" option by Superior. The preponderance of evidence points towards its use as a Rescue.

Everything fits fairly well actually as I get it in there. I'm surprised...

Last edited by Nicholas Studer; 06-03-2015 at 01:59 PM.
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:23 PM
William Koryciak William Koryciak is offline
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Is this the Pinter-Chrysler that's comming to Houston? I hope so and I will be excited to see it!
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