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Old 07-27-2020, 11:59 AM
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John ED Renstrom John ED Renstrom is offline
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Default why not copper

this old truck had some shade tree mechanic replace the brake line to the rear with copper. it has brakes leave it alone or replace it with the proper stuff is the question? i needed to order a fuel line so has them toss in the box that rear brake line. glad I did found a spot hidden by the gas tank that was going going gone. copper is way to soft and has problems with electrolysis also.
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Old 07-27-2020, 12:56 PM
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When Pinner Coach built my former 1963 Chrysler, they extended the brake line with a piece of copper. I also removed it, and spliced in a section of steel tubing. Wasn't that easy to do, since I had to cut out the compression rings that they used to extend the line, and then double flare the steel line to install the new section. I had to figure out the exact length to make the new line after it was flared, and this is where experience in flaring steel tubing comes into play. Can't be too long, or too short. Measure twice, and cut once!
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Old 07-27-2020, 04:02 PM
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Your work is never done. You always seem so excited to jump right in and get stuff done. Hell, I'm not looking forward to replacing air shocks on Lifeliner...
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Old 07-28-2020, 02:01 AM
Walter Suiter Walter Suiter is offline
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Steel lasts 10-12 years in NY, copper lasts minimally 30. Lot of trucks running around here with copper replacement lines.

Biggest problem using copper is people who fail to use lube between the back of the flare and the nut when pulling the line up. If it gals yer screwed.

Depending on the shop, many are and have been using Cuprinickle line off a coil rather than screwing around with steel. It's approved by DOT and corrosion rsistant. Volvo has used it for 40 years and I have yet to hear of a Volvo blowing a line.

Couple mechanics I know tell me they can generally find a complete line set in a dealer stockroom cheap with a few calls.
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Old 07-28-2020, 10:15 AM
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Not really sure why this one had a hole in it it were it was but i know it snapped in two there with ease. Vary thin in that spot. We don't have these kind of problems here. The lower humidity is a lot kinder on things.
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Old 07-28-2020, 03:42 PM
Walter Suiter Walter Suiter is offline
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This is going to sound somewhat less than sane, and prove out to be more work than it's really worth.

Find a way to slit the tube lengthwise in the area where it blew out and look at the inside surface. I bet you find a lot of rust. I'll even throw in the suggestion of a Drmel with a slitting wheel.

While I've never proven it myself my reading indicates brake fluid gains water over its service life and becomes acidic. I've also read a few articles strongly asserting US auto manufacturers use an inferior alloy brake line to other alloys that have been long available. I can personally attest to GM vehicles having a slightly longer than 10 year service life on brake lines having experienced it on 2 different vehicles.
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