Friends of the Professional Car Society - Official Website of the Professional Car Society, Inc.

Friends of the Professional Car Society - Official Website of the Professional Car Society, Inc. (http://www.professionalcarsociety.org/forums/index.php)
-   Technical Discussion Forum (http://www.professionalcarsociety.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=4)
-   -   Constant clicking under coach area while off (http://www.professionalcarsociety.org/forums/showthread.php?t=20896)

Blake Sherwin 12-30-2017 10:16 AM

Constant clicking under coach area while off
 
Parked my 68 cadillac last night amd noticed a clicking noise in the back aftet it was off. I figured it would stop in a bit. Came out the next morning and its still making the noise.

I checked the heater knobs in the back and no luck there. Not sure what this is. This ring a bell to anyone?

Blake Sherwin 12-30-2017 11:05 AM

Nevermind, i figured it out. Apparently i took the key out in aux. Battery is dead now

Paul Steinberg 12-30-2017 11:35 AM

Time to replace the key cylinder. Don't try to replace it yourself, or you will be buying a new steering column. It is a job for someone with experience and proper tools to do the job. Just make sure that you have the new key cylinder keyed to match the rest of the car, before the key cylinder is installed.

John ED Renstrom 12-30-2017 12:34 PM

68 still has the switch in the dash. 69 is the first column mounted switch. That being said there are no longer and new switches for the 68. That was the problem with the one I had. But you only make the take the key out in the auxiliary position mistake once.

But the clicking noise in the rear may be either the heater or Ac motor. Check to see if all the switches by the attendant seat are off. Superior may have a master switch on the dash also.

Paul Steinberg 12-30-2017 12:54 PM

The clicking might have been an electric fuel pump.
To remove the ignition switch cylinder on your car, straighten a paper clip, and then put the key into the cylinder. On the face of the cylinder, you will see a small hole. Insert the paper clip into this hole, after you turn the key to the accessory position, and give the paper clip a gentle push to depress the button behind that hole, while turning the key cylinder further to the left. This will remove the key cylinder. Then take the cylinder and key to your local locksmith, and have new tumblers installed in the cylinder. This should fix your problem. On the cylinder side, you will usually find a 4 digit, or combination of digits and letters code, that will be the key number. The locksmith will use this code to make you a new key, and to install new tumblers. I would record this code, where you won't loose it, and also have a few additional keys cut by number. Then when you get home with the repaired cylinder, you insert the cylinder in approximately the same angle that it was removed with the key inserted into the cylinder, and turn the key to the right. This will lock the cylinder into the ignition switch, and you will not have any more problems like the one you just experienced.
If your cylinder doesn't have a key code on it, then the locksmith may or may not be able to put new tumblers into the lock cylinder, depending on how worn your key is. If this is the case, then you will need to remove a door lock cylinder to get the code. If you get to the point where this becomes necessary, I or John can give you instructions on how to do this next step. Hopefully, you will luck out, and there will be a number.
One last thing, disconnect the battery positive terminal before you remove the key cylinder, so you don't run the battery down a second time. The locksmith may do the work while you wait, or he might say to come back a day or two later, depending on how busy he is. Changing tumblers isn't a difficult job for the locksmith, only time consuming to look up the code, cut the key, and do the cylinder work. I would say no more than an hours work total. A really experienced locksmith could probably knock it out in a half hour.

Blake Sherwin 01-02-2018 01:20 PM

Thanks for the information Paul. Before I jump on that im actually going to try to have a door key made. This car didnt come with door keys, only ignition. And theres a padlock on the back door (not sure why, no point in locking the back if the sides dont lock)

Peter Grave 01-02-2018 05:13 PM

Door lock should remove by prying tab on backside of door by the lock. Lock will have key number stamped in it, Easy for key shop to make key. Ignition lock must have been changed as Ignition and door lock same key till 1975 when they changed it as too many cars being stolen. I could be wrong on the year memory not what it was might have been 1965.The thieves would buy a key machine and code book vice grip the lock out of a door. Go back to their car and key machine read key number on lock make key go back to car insert key in other door unlock put key in ignition drive away like they owned it.

John ED Renstrom 01-02-2018 09:01 PM

on the coach the door key and the ignition key should be the same. they only way they are different is if some one changed the ignition. but the easiest one to get out is the back door. not a lot of junk in your way or to take off

Blake Sherwin 01-02-2018 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John ED Renstrom (Post 841923116)
on the coach the door key and the ignition key should be the same. they only way they are different is if some one changed the ignition. but the easiest one to get out is the back door. not a lot of junk in your way or to take off

Thanks for this, i was already nervous about messing uo the door panels. I will start with the back

Peter Grave 01-02-2018 11:54 PM

Open front door if you do not find back easy. Look at the back of the door (part with latch on it you should see a black spring steel tab facing tward the inside that is what holds the door lock in. Pry the tab twards the rear it will come out then you can remove the lock. Key code should be stamped in lock


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:47 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2009 - 2018 Friends of the Professional Car Society