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Richard Vyse
05-21-2009, 02:23 PM
The time has come to get this installed in the Lifeliner since it will be here Saturday. I've heard from members on how to hook this up but, can I get detailed instructions please.

1) Mount under the hood
2) Get a solenoid
3) Get 12 ga wire
4) Get a switch
5) Hook directly to the battery

Thanks

Richard

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1NnZ1C4IO0

Paul Steinberg
05-21-2009, 03:56 PM
The instructions below are for the B & M Siren, should anyone ever need them.

http://www.postimage.org/aV8Is30.jpg (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=aV8Is30)

http://www.postimage.org/aV8IJw0.jpg (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=aV8IJw0)

Here are the install instructions (http://www.fedsig.com/products/docs/install/2561065C.pdf) for the Federal Q2 siren, which uses the same type of wiring diagram as the Model 28, except that the 28 doesn't have a brake.

Richard Vyse
05-21-2009, 04:14 PM
Wow, just what I needed. Thanks Paul.

Richard

Richard Vyse
05-21-2009, 04:29 PM
In reviewing the wiring diagram for this unit, it does not call for a solenoid switch and has it wired directly to the battery with a 15 amp fuse.

Does this make sense and the correct way to do this?

Richard

Daniel Scully
05-21-2009, 06:10 PM
In reviewing the wiring diagram for this unit, it does not call for a solenoid switch and has it wired directly to the battery with a 15 amp fuse.

Does this make sense and the correct way to do this?

HUH? There is a solenoid in each diagram.

Doug Benson
05-21-2009, 08:03 PM
I think Richard means the instruction sheet that came with his siren, not the B & M instruction sheets.

John ED Renstrom
05-22-2009, 12:07 AM
check it out here http://www.dropshots.com/jer57747#date/2009-04-30/09:54:20 better to use the solenoid and smaller wire for the switch and keep your heavy wire short as you can.

Richard Vyse
05-22-2009, 08:55 AM
I think Richard means the instruction sheet that came with his siren, not the B & M instruction sheets.

Correct.

Richard

Richard Vyse
05-22-2009, 08:58 AM
check it out here http://www.dropshots.com/jer57747#date/2009-04-30/09:54:20 better to use the solenoid and smaller wire for the switch and keep your heavy wire short as you can.

this will be very helpful Ed, Thanks. Are you able to email detailed instructions on the wiring job. Please send to: hinsb@msn.com

It would be very appreciated. Looks like I will need to build a mount like your.

Richard

Dwayne Brooks
05-22-2009, 10:38 AM
Thanks Ed, the one pic in your album was all I needed to wire up my Federal 28 safely & avoid a meltdown in the '67 using a solenoid!

Richard Vyse
05-22-2009, 11:00 AM
I should be able to get mine hooked based upon this picture. Thanks Ed.

Richard

I take it the two small wires go to the switch....

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i277/RichardV_2006/150448.jpg

Paul Steinberg
05-22-2009, 11:30 AM
There are a wide variety of solenoids that are available, however, you want to make sure that the one you choose is rated for continuous duty. In Ed's picture, it appears that he is using a 2 wire solenoid. One small wire goes from the solenoid to ground, and the other wire goes to a power source to activate the solenoid. The other way to wire this would be to provide a fused hot lead to the solenoid that is either switched on with the ignition switch, or is hot at all times. Then one ground wire would go to the switch that activates the siren, and the other side of the siren switch would have a wire to the ground terminal of the solenoid. How you wire the siren depends on the type of constant duty solenoid you purchase. In the instance of wiring sirens everyone has a personal preference as to accomplish this, and there are many ways that are correct. I have wired sirens using many different methods in the past. Whenever possible, my preference is to wire the siren using the automobiles horn as my switching method. This requires more of a working knowledge of how the horn blowing circuit operates, but is the most simple way for the vehicle operator to use a siren. A single flip of a dash switch toggles between the cars horn circuit and the siren blowing circuit. Almost all automobile horn blowing circuits operate by grounding the horn blowing relay that then provides current to the horns themselves. That is where the similarity ends, since some cars, the horns are dead when the ignition is off, and others, the horns will blow at all times.

John ED Renstrom
05-22-2009, 01:10 PM
weather you use a grounded solenoid or a isolated one would depend on weather or not your switch in the cab is open or grounded. I had a good ford starter solenoid that I was going to use but it was grounded threw the case and my switch was grounded in the cab and I could not get to it with out cutting things up. make sure your switch is a good heave duty one that will stand your pondering on it. a push button on the dash will work but how do you steer and run the 28 at the same time. the cheaper the duty cycle on the solenoid the more you risk it sticking, closed. but it is wired the same as Paul's diagram. siren mounted. solenoid mounted. 6 gage wire run from a direct source of the + side of the battery to the solenoid. out it to the 28. the hot wire goes from the ignition switch to one post from the other post to the foot switch. out the foot switch to ground. when you turn the key on, the wire to the solenoid is hot. step on the foot switch and the circuit is now completed and the solenoid closes and the 28 howls. this would be switching the ground. if you solenoid is ground then the 28 would be wired the same but the hot wire would go from the ignition to the foot switch then out to the solenoid. that would be switching the power side. no advantage to ether system it's just depends on which type of solenoid you have. cole-Hersee makes both as they make all most all of them used in the automotive field. a 65 amp continuous duty will run you around 50 bucks retail 25 to 50 e-bay. a ford - chy starter type grounded either way will run about 25 retail. the picture shows a 24059 cole Hersee I want to use on my ambulance for the cut off switch. I replaced it with a wells f-498. the cole-Hersee is made in Mexico the well in china you choice. but making solenoids is another of those jobs Americans won't do