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View Full Version : Constant clicking under coach area while off


Blake Sherwin
12-30-2017, 09:16 AM
Parked my 68 cadillac last night amd noticed a clicking noise in the back aftet it was off. I figured it would stop in a bit. Came out the next morning and its still making the noise.

I checked the heater knobs in the back and no luck there. Not sure what this is. This ring a bell to anyone?

Blake Sherwin
12-30-2017, 10:05 AM
Nevermind, i figured it out. Apparently i took the key out in aux. Battery is dead now

Paul Steinberg
12-30-2017, 10:35 AM
Time to replace the key cylinder. Don't try to replace it yourself, or you will be buying a new steering column. It is a job for someone with experience and proper tools to do the job. Just make sure that you have the new key cylinder keyed to match the rest of the car, before the key cylinder is installed.

John ED Renstrom
12-30-2017, 11:34 AM
68 still has the switch in the dash. 69 is the first column mounted switch. That being said there are no longer and new switches for the 68. That was the problem with the one I had. But you only make the take the key out in the auxiliary position mistake once.

But the clicking noise in the rear may be either the heater or Ac motor. Check to see if all the switches by the attendant seat are off. Superior may have a master switch on the dash also.

Paul Steinberg
12-30-2017, 11:54 AM
The clicking might have been an electric fuel pump.
To remove the ignition switch cylinder on your car, straighten a paper clip, and then put the key into the cylinder. On the face of the cylinder, you will see a small hole. Insert the paper clip into this hole, after you turn the key to the accessory position, and give the paper clip a gentle push to depress the button behind that hole, while turning the key cylinder further to the left. This will remove the key cylinder. Then take the cylinder and key to your local locksmith, and have new tumblers installed in the cylinder. This should fix your problem. On the cylinder side, you will usually find a 4 digit, or combination of digits and letters code, that will be the key number. The locksmith will use this code to make you a new key, and to install new tumblers. I would record this code, where you won't loose it, and also have a few additional keys cut by number. Then when you get home with the repaired cylinder, you insert the cylinder in approximately the same angle that it was removed with the key inserted into the cylinder, and turn the key to the right. This will lock the cylinder into the ignition switch, and you will not have any more problems like the one you just experienced.
If your cylinder doesn't have a key code on it, then the locksmith may or may not be able to put new tumblers into the lock cylinder, depending on how worn your key is. If this is the case, then you will need to remove a door lock cylinder to get the code. If you get to the point where this becomes necessary, I or John can give you instructions on how to do this next step. Hopefully, you will luck out, and there will be a number.
One last thing, disconnect the battery positive terminal before you remove the key cylinder, so you don't run the battery down a second time. The locksmith may do the work while you wait, or he might say to come back a day or two later, depending on how busy he is. Changing tumblers isn't a difficult job for the locksmith, only time consuming to look up the code, cut the key, and do the cylinder work. I would say no more than an hours work total. A really experienced locksmith could probably knock it out in a half hour.

Blake Sherwin
01-02-2018, 12:20 PM
Thanks for the information Paul. Before I jump on that im actually going to try to have a door key made. This car didnt come with door keys, only ignition. And theres a padlock on the back door (not sure why, no point in locking the back if the sides dont lock)

Peter Grave
01-02-2018, 04:13 PM
Door lock should remove by prying tab on backside of door by the lock. Lock will have key number stamped in it, Easy for key shop to make key. Ignition lock must have been changed as Ignition and door lock same key till 1975 when they changed it as too many cars being stolen. I could be wrong on the year memory not what it was might have been 1965.The thieves would buy a key machine and code book vice grip the lock out of a door. Go back to their car and key machine read key number on lock make key go back to car insert key in other door unlock put key in ignition drive away like they owned it.

John ED Renstrom
01-02-2018, 08:01 PM
on the coach the door key and the ignition key should be the same. they only way they are different is if some one changed the ignition. but the easiest one to get out is the back door. not a lot of junk in your way or to take off

Blake Sherwin
01-02-2018, 10:06 PM
on the coach the door key and the ignition key should be the same. they only way they are different is if some one changed the ignition. but the easiest one to get out is the back door. not a lot of junk in your way or to take off

Thanks for this, i was already nervous about messing uo the door panels. I will start with the back

Peter Grave
01-02-2018, 10:54 PM
Open front door if you do not find back easy. Look at the back of the door (part with latch on it you should see a black spring steel tab facing tward the inside that is what holds the door lock in. Pry the tab twards the rear it will come out then you can remove the lock. Key code should be stamped in lock

Joe Rackov
01-03-2018, 10:22 PM
IIRC 1968's no longer had the lock cylinder code stamped on the door lock cylinder as part of the attempt to reduce auto theft. 1967's had the code on them though.

Blake Sherwin
01-04-2018, 08:39 AM
Its back in the shop again to fix a plethora of leaks, and look into hesitation when going uphill or pushing the throttle too hard. As soon as I get it back I will take out that cylinder and take it to a locksmith. He told me that if I can get him the cylinder he can make a key for it, but he doesnt do work on cars, so I cant just bring him the car.

Then eventually I will address the ignition

John ED Renstrom
01-04-2018, 10:32 AM
Big question did you try the switch key in at least two of the doors? There should be only one key for that car. But most have had the switch changed. Don't forget to let the man know it's a switch key for the. Doors not a door key. He would figure it out soon enough but it helps to have a clue.

For the rear door it remove the handle, lock knob,trim pad, the a small cover. In the shell. Then find the tab on the spring clip use a ply bar to slide it off . The lock should slide out. Can't remember if it a tab in the slot or a wire. Tab will fall out if it's a wire you will need to work it around the corners to slip it off.

Believe it or not the cheap set of door tools at harbor freight is a good set. The clip remover works better then the snap on one I leave in the drawer. the pad remover the same.

Go slow don't force things and if it's stuck find that screw you missed taking out.

Blake Sherwin
01-09-2018, 11:06 AM
I tried removing the cylinder from multiple doors over the weekend. Unfortunately those screws were locked too tight for me to move. I talked to a local locksmith and he said often times the glove box lock is the same as the door, so he recommended trying to remove the glove box cylinder. Going to try that during my lunch hour today.

Chuck Kramer
01-09-2018, 01:47 PM
Parked my 68 cadillac last night amd noticed a clicking noise in the back aftet it was off. I figured it would stop in a bit. Came out the next morning and its still making the noise.

I checked the heater knobs in the back and no luck there. Not sure what this is. This ring a bell to anyone?

Maybe you have a family of crickets that moved inside for the winter?

Blake Sherwin
01-09-2018, 01:53 PM
Got the glove box cylinder out and took it to the locksmith, unfortunately it was different from the door

Paul Steinberg
01-09-2018, 03:02 PM
I tried removing the cylinder from multiple doors over the weekend. Unfortunately those screws were locked too tight for me to move. I talked to a local locksmith and he said often times the glove box lock is the same as the door, so he recommended trying to remove the glove box cylinder. Going to try that during my lunch hour today.

To take the lock out, you start by removing the inner door trim panel. It is held on by screws sometimes, and also clips that you need to pry loose. You will need to take all the inside door handles off first, including the top lock knob. You will find helpful hints in this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apWr3kEW9Qg


Once you have the door panel off, look inside the door with a flashlight, and you will see a clip that needs to be pulled sideways to release the key lock assembly. Once you have that removed, the cylinder will be loose. Refer to this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hu0O2HAed-E

I believe that the screws that you were attempting to remove, were the ones on the edge of the door, that hold the door latching mechanism to the door. Removing this isn't necessary.

Blake Sherwin
01-09-2018, 04:07 PM
I believe that the screws that you were attempting to remove, were the ones on the edge of the door, that hold the door latching mechanism to the door. Removing this isn't necessary.

Your right, thats what I was removing. the rear door trim has some water damage and is already detached on the side nearest the lock. I didnt see a panel under there which is why I was looking at the door screws.

The locksmith I visited today was nice enough to come out and look at the rear door with me and showed me what you are talking about, that theres a panel in the middle of the door, so I just need to remove more of that panel i guess.

I will take a look at these videos tonight. I will feel better once I can lock the hearse. My wife is worried some kids will get into it and vandalize the interior.

John ED Renstrom
01-09-2018, 10:37 PM
As it's not a standard car you will find the lock is stamped. But did you try the switch key in the lock? Normal car square key for the switch round key for glove box and door. On the commerical chassis its the switch key for the ignation and doors. I don't think I have ever seen a glove box key in a commerical chassis car.

John ED Renstrom
01-09-2018, 11:39 PM
you may find this set of pictures useful for you I believe we demented about every part of this car as we rebuilt it.
https://www.dropshots.com/jer57747/albums/308015

John ED Renstrom
01-09-2018, 11:41 PM
or this 69 that belongs to Paul https://www.dropshots.com/jer57747/albums/359955

Blake Sherwin
01-10-2018, 09:59 AM
These links are really helpful, thanks.

Blake Sherwin
01-11-2018, 05:37 PM
i have to say thanks again for those pics. I will be revisiting these alot, its pretty helpful. Probably going to try removing some rust from those floor panels in the back of mine this weekend. My rear door leaks too so the panels are all rusted out

Blake Sherwin
01-29-2018, 10:58 AM
Tried to get the lock out over the weekend. I did get in and almost got it out with the help of those videos, but the bar attaching to the lock mechanism seemed stuck. Could not get it out no matter how hard I tried. A few pictures

The door panel was already warped due to water damage so I was able to swivel it around the handle without worrying about bending it.

http://www.professionalcarsociety.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=339&pictureid=3499

Before removing the clip:

http://www.professionalcarsociety.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=339&pictureid=3500

After removing the clip:

http://www.professionalcarsociety.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=339&pictureid=3502

http://www.professionalcarsociety.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=339&pictureid=3501

On the bright side it was warm enough yesterday that I was able to peel off all the tacky skull stickers, so now the body is clean of stickers and decals at last. Now its 28 degree again though...

Paul Steinberg
01-29-2018, 11:31 AM
You would need to rotate the cylinder to get it to release from the locking shaft. Since you have it out this far, just look for a number on the side of the barrel, and take that number to the locksmith to have a new key cut by the code number.
The reason that the inside door panel is warped, is because the bodybuilder never sealed the large access hole with waterproof paper or plastic sheeting. They saved money anyplace that it couldn't be seen. These cars were never intended to be in service beyond 10 years, and then off to the junkyard mortuary. That is why we rarely ever see many clean rust free cars from the 1930's, 1940's, & 1950's. Only in the 1960's, did some of these cars start to be saved for posterity.

John ED Renstrom
01-29-2018, 11:46 AM
that one has the keeper on the tap of the lock. it is latched on the lock with a tab in a hole. from the inside you need to put a small flat blade under it and lift the end up. then slide it off the lock. that keeper is made to assemble not to remove. they are a pain in the butt. once you do a few thousand of them you get the trick down.

not a lot of room to get you hands in there. but they are a snap to assemble.

here are a a couple pictures of the rod fasteners and how they go on and off. I don't have a lock like that one in the junk box but here is how it sets and were you need to lift it out of the hole and the direction you need to slid to get it off the rod

Blake Sherwin
01-29-2018, 12:10 PM
You would need to rotate the cylinder to get it to release from the locking shaft. Since you have it out this far, just look for a number on the side of the barrel, and take that number to the locksmith to have a new key cut by the code number.
The reason that the inside door panel is warped, is because the body builder never sealed the large access hole with waterproof paper or plastic sheeting. They saved money anyplace that it couldn't be seen. These cars were never intended to be in service beyond 10 years, and then off to the junkyard mortuary. That is why we rarely ever see many clean rust free cars from the 1930's, 1940's, & 1950's. Only in the 1960's, did some of these cars start to be saved for posterity.

Thanks I will clean the outside of the cylinder a bit and see if I can find a number and do that. Good info about the waterproofing.

that one has the keeper on the tap of the lock. it is latched on the lock with a tab in a hole. from the inside you need to put a small flat blade under it and lift the end up. then slide it off the lock. that keeper is made to assemble not to remove. they are a pain in the butt. once you do a few thousand of them you get the trick down.

not a lot of room to get you hands in there. but they are a snap to assemble.

here are a a couple pictures of the rod fasteners and how they go on and off. I don't have a lock like that one in the junk box but here is how it sets and were you need to lift it out of the hole and the direction you need to slid to get it off the rod

Handy pictures. I will keep that in mind. Going to try copying down that code first and see if that gets me taken care of. I did see something that I think may have been one of those keepers. It was hard to get a visual but I pulled on it a bit, but was taking care not to bend anything.

All things considered this was easier to get to than I had anticipated

Blake Sherwin
02-13-2018, 01:11 PM
Good news! it was warm one day last week so I drove the hearse to work. During lunch I decided to find a nearby locksmith that I hadnt tried yet and drove over to see if he could help with the rear lock since I hadnt had luck getting it out.

Since I already had the panel off and got the clip off for him he didnt charge an exorbitant fee to work on it. He struggled a bit but eventually got it disconnected from the pawl. He had me a key in less than an hour, he had to take a buffer to the cylinder before the code appeared.

At first I noticed that the key only worked in the rear door, so I asked if this was just because I needed to lube the locks given they havent moved in so long.

He told me maybe, they do need lubricant but he took a closer look at the key and told me he needed to modify it.

Most of you probably know this already but it was news to me so i'm going to share it on the offchance:

Apparently the OLD GM keys had a little groove on them that a notch in the lock would slide down. Well the new GM key blanks dont have this groove anymore, so the flat edge where that groove should be gets stuck where the notch hits it.

He had to take a small file and sanded that flat edge so it was more of a slope, then after some lube the lock started working perfect.

Like I said im sure no doubt most of you are aware but if anyone wants it I can take a picture of the modified key next to an original GM key from the 70s I have (that key is a different story)

Paul Steinberg
02-13-2018, 02:05 PM
Have a bunch of keys made by this locksmith, and then put the original one that he made away for safe keeping. Consider the one that he just made to be a 1st generation key, and every key that is cut using that key as a pattern, is a 2nd generation key. If you use a 2nd generation key to make additional keys, those keys are 3rd generation keys, and will not work as well as the original or the 2nd generation key. The further out you get, the more error is introduced in the replacement keys. A copy of a copy, of a copy never works as well as the original key. Also, I hope that he gave you the key number so if you should ever need another original key, it can be made from that number.

Blake Sherwin
02-13-2018, 02:08 PM
Have a bunch of keys made by this locksmith, and then put the original one that he made away for safe keeping. Consider the one that he just made to be a 1st generation key, and every key that is cut using that key as a pattern, is a 2nd generation key. If you use a 2nd generation key to make additional keys, those keys are 3rd generation keys, and will not work as well as the original or the 2nd generation key. The further out you get, the more error is introduced in the replacement keys. A copy of a copy, of a copy never works as well as the original key. Also, I hope that he gave you the key number so if you should ever need another original key, it can be made from that number.

Yes he did give me that key number. Wrote it down for safekeeping

Peter Grave
02-13-2018, 05:22 PM
Put key number on the title in a margin then you will always find it.

Blake Sherwin
02-14-2018, 09:51 AM
Just for posterity I will put a pic in here comparing the new key to an original key for a different 70s hearse

John ED Renstrom
02-14-2018, 11:30 AM
You can find the proper blanks on line. Like i said its a switch key blank. Someone has changed the switch which now gives you two keys for the car instead of one. To keep them apart i always ground the corners of the door key. You could have him pull the tumblers of the ignition and re key it to the door locks to go back to a single key. But its not nessary. Just make sure you mark the door key or as I have done get one of the none stock key cut for the switch key so that it is different. You risk finding your selfe twisting the switch key off in the door lock one day as they both go in.

Blake Sherwin
02-14-2018, 04:16 PM
I tested this key on another door this morning and noticed it worked but I had some difficulty as I could only unlock if I pushed inwards with some force as a turned.

After comparing them again I suddenly noticed another key difference between the OLD GM keys and the new GM blanks. While the keys themselves are the same length, the actual functional part of the key is shorter, so that may be a contributing factor. I'm going to do as John said and find some old GM blanks online and have those cut.

John ED Renstrom
02-14-2018, 09:15 PM
Your pushing the door key in to far. Original parts group , rubber the right way. Are two sources that come to mindfor the proper blank there afe a lot of differences in those two blanks.