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View Full Version : 1941 CADILLAC SUPERIOR Ambulance


Peter Grave
09-09-2017, 11:25 PM
1941 CADILLAC SUPERIOR 75 FIRE DEPARTMENT EMERGENCY CAR, FROM THE COHOCTON FIRE DEPT IN COHOCTON N.Y. THE FOLLOWING HAS BEEN INSTALLED AND DONE ON THE CAR: NEW LUCAS 6 PLY TIRES, NEW ALL 4 BRAKE WHEEL CYLINDERS,NEW MASTER CYLINDER, NEW CUSTOM BENT AS ORIGINAL METAL BRAKE LINES. NEW GAS TANK( THE ORIGINAL IS INCLUDED), NEW METAL GAS LINE,NEW MASTER CYLINDER.RE-CORED TRIPLE CORE RADIATOR.NEW BELTS AND HOSES.THE FOLLOWING HAVE BEEN REBUILT:CARB,WATER PUMP,GENERATOR AND FUEL PUMP.THE OIL PAN HAS BEEN REPLACED WITH A LIKE NEW ONE. NEW PLUGS,WIRES,POINTS AND CONDENSER.THE REAR END AND TRANSMISSION OIL HAS BEEN CHANGED.THE WHEEL BEARINGS HAVE BEEN REPLACED.THIS CAR HAS THE ORIGINAL TRIM RINGS AND HUBCAPS. http://www.ebay.com/itm/263185395908?rmvSB=true

Tim Prieur
09-10-2017, 03:01 AM
Wish there were some more interior shots.
Hope someone can take this on.

Bill Marcy
09-10-2017, 06:25 PM
This car is a unique opportunity to own a 1941 for not a pile of money, I would imagine.

John ED Renstrom
09-10-2017, 09:49 PM
there are a few people around that can do it money wise. now if only we knew what he wanted for it.

Jim Ireland
09-10-2017, 10:11 PM
The front flashers are interesting, as is the single rear STOP flasher. Makes me think of it as an ambulance. The black door jams and interior cloth makes me think combination. Not sure and not clear what was taken out of the back.

https://www.facebook.com/thisoldambulance/photos/pcb.1951209471818663/1951209031818707/?type=3&theater

Steve Loftin
09-10-2017, 10:26 PM
My money says converted combination (or even a hearse).

John ED Renstrom
09-11-2017, 11:11 AM
I would so so. Rollers gone and new floor put in the hatch cut threw the sill was a different way to hack it up. Nothing but smooth sides from the divider back. It would be a vary good canadate to put back to what it was.

Kurt Arends
09-11-2017, 01:03 PM
I have to disagree on putting it back to what it was originally. This one will always be worth more(to most people) as an ambulance, even if it was originally a hearse or combo. Not enough pizzazz with this one as a hearse. I would imagine that this coach spent the majority of its "working life" as an ambulance and that history has a lot of value, regardless of what it was originally built to be.

John ED Renstrom
09-12-2017, 12:25 AM
but if all that is left of the ambulance is the lights out side have you saved? granted the east would have been a tossing one and the gurney could have been any thing for a stretcher to one of the road flats. but looking at the interior shots here is nothing inside except the trap door that says ambulance.

John ED Renstrom
09-12-2017, 12:40 AM
here are the inside pictures and one from the rear. the grab bar makes one think parade rig. but really it could have been use for any purpose by the fire dep. there is nothing that really ides it as a ambulance the top light is a brake light

Paul Steinberg
09-12-2017, 01:10 AM
Given the black paint on the door jam, the deep red crushed velvet interior, what is left of it, and the two cut outs in the floor at the rear, I would be more inclined to believing that this was a hearse, or at best, a combination vehicle, as others have previously said. As for the grab bar at the back of the vehicle, that has me wondering when it was added, or if it originally served a different purpose. Possibly one of our more members with knowledge of the time period that this was built, will have some answers. It was not unusual for funeral homes to give old hearses to fire department for fire equipment cars, once they had served out there original purpose as a hearse, and were no longer needed for services. Back then, in the funeral business, it was all about perception, and a 10 year old hearse looked grossly dated, and to some it gave the impression that the funeral home wasn't doing well financially.

Mike McDonald
09-12-2017, 08:11 AM
Paul: Case in point.....my first professional car at 15 years old was a 1938 Buick Series 90 Limited Limo that Berry-Bell Mortuary purchased new and gave to our local Fallbrook Fire Dept in the early 50's who converted it in to a Sedan Ambulance. MM

Keith Snyder
09-12-2017, 10:46 AM
That so called "grab bar" at the rear of the car was a styling affectation applied to all Superior professional cars from the mid-Thirties through the early Forties. As far as I am aware, it served no useful function but looked classy.

Kurt Arends
09-12-2017, 11:34 AM
Given the black paint on the door jam, the deep red crushed velvet interior, what is left of it, and the two cut outs in the floor at the rear, I would be more inclined to believing that this was a hearse, or at best, a combination vehicle, as others have previously said. As for the grab bar at the back of the vehicle, that has me wondering when it was added, or if it originally served a different purpose. Possibly one of our more members with knowledge of the time period that this was built, will have some answers. It was not unusual for funeral homes to give old hearses to fire department for fire equipment cars, once they had served out there original purpose as a hearse, and were no longer needed for services. Back then, in the funeral business, it was all about perception, and a 10 year old hearse looked grossly dated, and to some it gave the impression that the funeral home wasn't doing well financially.


"Crushed Velvet"? There was no such thing in 1941. That would be Mohair! I think that it is safe to assume that this coach was originally a combo or end-loader, based on the roller cut-outs in the sil plate/floor access door. I hope that it sold to someone who will preserve its history and restore it to when it served as a fire department support rig.

Paul Steinberg
09-12-2017, 11:44 AM
"Crushed Velvet"? There was no such thing in 1941. That would be Mohair!

I used the term "crushed velvet", because today, most of our members under the age of 50, have no idea what "mohair" is or was.

Kurt Arends
09-12-2017, 02:49 PM
Just "ribbing you" Paul. I figured that you could tell the difference.

Peter Grave
09-12-2017, 03:26 PM
Mohair is what I wish I had! Also don't forget Mosstread Carpeting.A Packard favorite,

Kurt Arends
09-12-2017, 03:42 PM
How much do you need? I always watch for the stuff. I have a HUGE burgundy mohair panel that hung behind an alter in a church, so it was never exposed to direct sunlight.