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View Full Version : Preperation for Driving to International Meet


Paul Steinberg
03-24-2017, 12:35 PM
I have copied David Henry's post from the 2017 International Meet Forum, to the Technical Forum, because it deserves its own thread and replies.

David Henry
03-24-2017, 09:06 PM
Hopefully this will be my first PCS meet. I am contemplating driving my 1973 Miller Meteor Lifeliner Ambulance which would be about 1,300 round trip.

For those of you that drive your procar those kinds of distances, are there any spare parts that you usually carry with you in anticipation of a breakdown? Or don't sweat it?

Paul Steinberg
03-25-2017, 11:55 AM
I check all the common maintenance items on the car before embarking on any long distance trip, and I carry a spare fuel pump, since I know that finding a fuel pump for an air conditioned 1969 Cadillac is not going to be stocked in the auto parts stores. Most of the other "maintenance" items are more universally stocked in most of the auto parts stores, since they fit more than just Cadillac.
To me, there are a couple of systems that can lead to disastrous consequences if they fail, so these I check very carefully. They are tires, steering, and brakes. A bad transmission or differential will leave you stranded at the side of the road, but bad tires, steering, or brakes, can lead to crashing into another car or something that litters the side of the road, like a tree or telephone pole. Triple A will change a tire on your car, but sometimes they will not want to tow the car, claiming that it isn't a passenger car, but a commercial vehicle. For this reason, if your automobile policy covers towing, that will help to pay for the tow. Some antique auto insurers have supplemental insurance similar to Triple A that will cover towing, so that is another option to consider.

David Henry
03-25-2017, 12:43 PM
When I insured my ambulance I had them add flat bed towing for up to 200 miles. So, I appreciate you validating that thought. So I will find a fuel pump to add to the equipment of the ambulance. As always the people here are always willing to share.

Paul Steinberg
03-25-2017, 01:08 PM
The fuel pump for my 1969 is the same pump that was used from 1969 through 1976 on the Cadillac with air conditioning. I found many stores had the pump for the cars without air conditioning, but not with air conditioning. I am not certain exactly what the difference is, but if I had to take a guess, it is that the air conditioned car pump has a return to the fuel tank.
One of the best things that you can do is to take your car on a couple hour drive around home, and see how it performs. I took my car on a hour drive last summer, and part way there I found that my radiator had a pin hole leak, and then it stopped leaking. While working on the car, a wrench was dropped, and it damaged the radiator core, so out it came, and took it to the radiator shop. Under inspection, it was determined that the core was so degraded that a new core was required. $600 later, a new core was installed, and all is well. Old cars seem to always need something to be done to them, and if it is a Cadillac, it is going to always cost more than a Chevrolet.
Also, check and / or replace all the radiator hoses, gas line hoses, etc., if you don't know when they were last replaced. A burst hose is a major problem when it happens, and can be prevented without much expense with replacements. If you choose not to replace them, then carry a roll of duct tape and a few gallons of water, and have spares tucked away in the car, along with the tools to do the job. I prefer to change them at home, when the engine is cold and outside temperature is cool.

Kurt Arends
03-25-2017, 01:52 PM
Unless your tires are new, take your fender skirts off prior to leaving home. Yes, all Cadillacs are butt-ugly without skirts, but if you blow a tire it will destroy your skirt 95% of the time and it will tear the mounting brackets off of the quarter panels.

John ED Renstrom
03-25-2017, 09:10 PM
A good look at the pressure side of the power steering pump. If it is covered in oil not coming from the valve cover ,change it if the oil is coming from the valve cover change it. If the pressure hose blows you get a instent fire as the hot oil sprayed on the hot exhaust. That nusence oil drip from that valve cover on a long run can go threw a lot of oil.
Then carry a credit card is all you need. And start driving your car. Do it regularly and often. Like back and forth to work. You find that and any troubles you have well show show up at home not 300 miles from it

Rich Koski
03-26-2017, 12:14 AM
We carry a tote with the following items when we go to shows: Alternator, starter, water pump, fuel pump, fuel filter, belts, and radiator hoses. We also carry oil, transmission fluid, power steering fluid, brake fluid, and antifreeze. A bottle jack, wheel chocks, and a fire extinguisher are also along for the ride.

John ED Renstrom
03-26-2017, 11:32 AM
Don't forget they reinstated the requirement that all cars on the show field are mandated to have wheel chocks in place and a fire extinguisher. this last board meeting, Don't know if the placement of it by the right front tire was included in that or not. Be sure to drop In to harbor freight or wall Mart and get yours and keep it in your car.

Paul Steinberg
03-26-2017, 11:33 AM
That has to be an extremely heavy tote. I have quite a few spares, however, I don't have a spare starter, and only last month did I acquire a spare alternator. I do however, do have a couple of spare regulators, but without both a regulator and an alternator, one isn't very much good without the other. I never saw much of a need to carry spare fluids, except for water, since the oils rarely if ever get low all at once, and you can almost always pick these items up locally. I do keep a 6 penny nail head, O ring, and a tubing wrench along for the ride, but have never seemed to ever need it. This is only in the Cadillac, since it won't work for the Chevrolet. Anyone care to guess what it is for.... ;)

Daniel Scully
03-26-2017, 12:17 PM
That has to be an extremely heavy tote. I have quite a few spares, however, I don't have a spare starter, and only last month did I acquire a spare alternator. I do however, do have a couple of spare regulators, but without both a regulator and an alternator, one isn't very much good without the other. I never saw much of a need to carry spare fluids, except for water, since the oils rarely if ever get low all at once, and you can almost always pick these items up locally. I do keep a 6 penny nail head, O ring, and a tubing wrench along for the ride, but have never seemed to ever need it. This is only in the Cadillac, since it won't work for the Chevrolet. Anyone care to guess what it is for.... ;)

To plug that brake line, do you carry leather belts for your babbitt bearings.;)

Paul Steinberg
04-02-2017, 12:34 AM
To plug that brake line, do you carry leather belts for your babbitt bearings.;)

This is the correct answer. It is a "plug" incase a brake line should rupture or some other failure. With one side plugged, you get full braking pressure on the other end of the braking system.
Not fond of the leather belt, I prefer bacon rind. I gona put some Bon-Ami down the carburetor also, before I leave on the trip. Also, might need to take a piece of wood, and a saw, to cure a problem if the rear starts making noise. :rolleyes:

John ED Renstrom
04-02-2017, 11:31 AM
But to help answer the question. You best bet is to drive the car fix the things you notice as you drive it before you head out. Keep small stuff that you could change your self like the old belts in the underfloor storage. Other spair parts that you have for the car that will fit can be carried there also. I find that keeping the parts for the car with the car just helps. The the other thing you need to do is go down to the dealership and tour the repair shop. This will help remind you that they are only working on cars less then 5 years old every day.