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View Full Version : '68 Superior Pontiac Ambulance


Kurt Arends
01-03-2017, 09:12 PM
In Seattle, WA.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/1968-Pontiac-Bonneville-Ambulance-/232194416354?&_trksid=p2056016.m2516.l5255

Kurt Arends
01-03-2017, 09:23 PM
In looking at the interior photos, you can see that the cabinet has been removed. When you look at the exterior photos, it looks like there is a cabinet sitting loose just inside of the back door.

This rig looks to be extremely straight. Could be pretty much rust-free, if always in the Seattle area. Well worth the opening price of $5800 with no reserve.

John ED Renstrom
01-03-2017, 10:04 PM
If i was looking I would deal with bill his is painted and has a better interier

Kurt Arends
01-03-2017, 11:50 PM
Just depends upon what you want. I love the color of Bill's '68, but if you didn't like the color of his you would be better off chasing this one. This one looks to have been all white originally.

John ED Renstrom
01-04-2017, 11:33 AM
That is the part that one would need to looking in there wallet and decide. 6 grad to paint and another 6 to do the interier. Then there is what ever mechanical issues this car may have that are unknown. Way in transportation cost. Bill's needs some interier work also. All things to think about. And things that detrtmen what the car is worth to you. Because let's face it you will get more money into restoring one then you can get out of a finished one. I feel the buy it now price has this car out of. The market for me. Some one local that could look the car over see the parts taken off are all there would have a advantage over me looking at a picture and a discription. But for me I would rather buy one still together rather then one someone else took apart. Been there done that to many times. Noting worse then having a few grand in a car missing one light you can't find. It has taken me 5 years to locate and get repaired the lights for the,53. Now we are into this 67 only to discover trim is needed that I can't seem to locate. It's the little things that hold you up. You want to keep them down as much as possible.

Kerry Lange
01-04-2017, 01:02 PM
In looking at the interior photos, you can see that the cabinet has been removed. When you look at the exterior photos, it looks like there is a cabinet sitting loose just inside of the back door.

This rig looks to be extremely straight. Could be pretty much rust-free, if always in the Seattle area. Well worth the opening price of $5800 with no reserve.

I think what you're seeing through the window is the rear floor compartment in the raised position.

Bill Marcy
01-04-2017, 06:24 PM
I thought I would throw in my two cents worth here. Some of you may think my numbers are high, but it is how much I spent so far. Keep in mind that my car sat for eight years.

Mechanically; all fluids changed, gas tank redone, master cylinder, brakes, radiator, water pump, tune up, belts and hoses, battery, approximately$5,000.

New American Classic radials $700 plus mounting and balancing.

Paint, body work and bumpers rechromed, bought another rear bumper, fender skirts, lights, lenses, mirrors approximately $11,000

Front seat upholstered, new rubber mat in front and armrests recovered $1050

Exhaust system $350

Drive shaft redone, new u-joints $350

Plus what I paid for the car $4,000. Not to mention shipping costs.

And lots of little stuff, too. And truthfully, the car is far from perfect, but it still gets lots of attention and it runs like a bear.

So, you can see how quickly the money spends, to say nothing of hunting for parts and the time spent waiting. It is something we do for the love of it, but it is always better to buy a car that has had some, or all of the work done to it.

No doubt, some of you can do some of the work, or might get better prices, but in my area, this is what it costs.

John ED Renstrom
01-04-2017, 09:47 PM
Even at doing it yourself buying parts at stocking dealer a man will get half to 3/4 that into one. Depending on what you can do. Some things we all have to farm out.

Richard Vyse
01-05-2017, 06:52 AM
Adds up quick. I'm putting another 3 grand or more into the Lifeliner just with my current repairs with A/C, A/C install, and front end work.

Mike McDonald
01-05-2017, 07:52 AM
Bill: I don't think it's high at all.... I know (1st hand) what it costs and we do nearly 100% of our refurb work "in house". MM

Brendan Martin
01-05-2017, 11:17 PM
I'll say right now, it costs a substantial amount of money to restore one of these cars. That's with the PCS (Ed) discount. Bill's car is a beautiful example of a 60s Superior. If I had the storage, and dough it would be here in Rhode Island. As far as the vehicle for sale in this thread, it has potential; but potential equals dollars.

Kurt Arends
01-05-2017, 11:43 PM
I don't think that anyone is denying the fact that restoring one of these is a money-losing proposition. These things, like old homes, are a labor of love.

If you don't plan on keeping one for a considerable period of time, you probably should not take on a project needing so much work. This is not directed at anyone specifically.

I think Bill's rig is gorgeous! You did the right thing in adding the skirts!!

Brendan Martin
01-06-2017, 11:46 PM
I don't think that anyone is denying the fact that restoring one of these is a money-losing proposition. These things, like old homes, are a labor of love.

If you don't plan on keeping one for a considerable period of time, you probably should not take on a project needing so much work. This is not directed at anyone specifically.

I think Bill's rig is gorgeous! You did the right thing in adding the skirts!!

Kurt nobody thinks you directed at anyone. It's good conversation. I love your analogy about an old home; the difference is, you can flip a old home and make some dough. When I did my 63 I banked on losing thousands. That way I'm not disappointed. It's my car not my retirement account !

Russell Street
01-07-2017, 11:07 AM
When I first started hanging around this site, somebody once posted........." you buy one for $5, 6, maybe 7 or 8,000 dollars. Put $20 to maybe 30,000 in it to get it "right". When you get all done, you've got a very nice $12 to 15,000 car". That's paraphrased, but very close to what was posted and probably more true than any of us care to admit!!!!

Like Brandon said, it's not my retirement account, it's for my "pleasure" now!!! I must point out that all of us (me, Barb, all the grandkids) are enjoying the hell out of the '64.

John ED Renstrom
01-07-2017, 11:23 AM
That is the reason you do it. You do it right you have a new car. In 1964 you would drive a new caddy cost to cost. Today if you rebuild it right it will be just as or better then new. There are a few minor changes you can make to have it more dependable then it was. Like the points set up. Swap that out and you can run it forever with out resetting them. You get the price of a new car in one but you get a new car when it's done.

James Fischer
01-10-2017, 07:09 PM
Auction/BIN ended with no bids.:(