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Paul Steinberg
03-22-2016, 08:55 PM
Doing a Google search, the company that made this video is no longer in business under this name. I believe that they were purchased by Keystone, an LKQ company. They did the bumpers for my 1963 Pinner Chrysler.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxQOOrJ_llw

Richard Vyse
03-23-2016, 07:08 AM
How about painted chrome a new way of doing it. How about it Ed, something you could begin offering.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Up_CLJXRyaM

John ED Renstrom
03-23-2016, 01:29 PM
not really painting but a coating of silver ?? the same stuff on the back of the mirror. it is then clear coated to protect it. so it might as will be paint. it's about 5000 to get set up to do it. the cats hind end for the problem plastic pieces in the interior which are done that way. think how long they lasted and how most of then are rubbed off.

it may be good deal for Staci display pieces but I question the ability to stand up. a bad pitted piece of pot would have to have all the pits filled before and primed and sanded then coated and clear coated so it not a time saver on bad pieces. it would have ever stop then from melting in the heat of the plating tanks

Paul Steinberg
03-23-2016, 05:28 PM
How about painted chrome a new way of doing it. How about it Ed, something you could begin offering.



That has been around from the early 1950's. My dad had a plating business, that experimented with it on the Mack Bulldog hood ornament. It didn't hold up well enough, and the project was abandoned. Only wish that I still have one of those Mack bulldogs. I remember them well.

Philip Scanio
03-23-2016, 08:01 PM
Paul. I think the Bulldogs were precision casted here in Temple at C&H Diecasting in the late 60's and early 70's.

Kurt Arends
03-23-2016, 08:06 PM
I see those Mack Bulldogs in junk shops frequently.

Paul Steinberg
03-23-2016, 08:59 PM
Paul. I think the Bulldogs were precision casted here in Temple at C&H Diecasting in the late 60's and early 70's.

I believe that in the 1950's, that they were cast brass, and it was done somewhere in Elizabeth or Newark NJ. The shop was near the foundry, and the only thing that I clearly remember is that I was instructed to touch nothing, and to wash my hands before I left the building. Lots of hazardous chemicals.

Philip Scanio
03-23-2016, 09:20 PM
Paul, I think the Maxine?? model had a special ornament --maybe brass instead of chrome or silver. The Maxine was the Top of the Line as I remember.

David Henry
04-08-2016, 10:53 AM
We had an abandoned plating shop in the City where I worked as a paramedic. The site was about 1 mile from our level II trauma center.

it was discovered that all the vats still contained the plating chemicals and raw materials were on site the EPA jumped in. I knew this was a big deal when a semi truck rolled up to my main ambulance station and unloaded a skid of cyanide antidote kits.

We never had to use any of the while they were cleaning up the site. But I am still perplexed where the amyl nitrite capsules (poppers) in those kits disappeared to. :bunnies:

Jacob M. Fournier
06-30-2016, 11:27 PM
Paul, I think the Maxine?? model had a special ornament --maybe brass instead of chrome or silver. The Maxine was the Top of the Line as I remember.

A gold plated bulldog was used to indicate that the truck had a Maxidyne engine (Mack's high torque engine), instead of the standard Thermodyne engine or a competing brand of engine. This started with the introduction of the Maxidyne engine series in the late '60s and continued through the '90s. The gold bulldog was more recently re-introduced (2000s) to indicate that the truck features a fully Mack drivetrain - the engine, transmission and rear ends are an integrated system, vs. being supplied by different manufacturers.